Why is the Academy Award called Oscar?

World Book Explains: Why is the Academy Award called Oscar? Ric Robertson, Executive Administrator of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, discusses the different stories about how the Academy Award got the name Oscar. This video was filmed at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Hollywood, California.

Why are the Academy Awards Statuettes called Oscar?

 


Academy Awards are presented annually for outstanding achievements in filmmaking. The Academy Awards are supervised by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, with headquarters in Beverly Hills, California. Awards are announced for motion pictures made during the previous year. Winners of an Academy Award receive a gold-plated statue commonly called an Oscar.

 

The origin of the award's nickname is not certain. According to one popular story, an academy librarian remarked that the statue resembled her Uncle Oscar. There is another story about Bette Davis who is a multiple Oscar winning actress. When she was receiving the Academy Awards, Bette said the Oscar statuette reminded her of her ex-husband. Both of those stories have no real evidences or documentations. The press began calling the award the Oscar in the late 1930's.

 

More information, visit World Book Online Encyclopedia.

 

Related Articles:

- What does the Academy do other than present Oscars?

- How did the Academy Awards get started?

- How does the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences choose its members?


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